An official website of the United States government
Here's how you know
A .mil website belongs to an official U.S. Department of Defense organization in the United States.
A lock (lock ) or https:// means you’ve safely connected to the .mil website. Share sensitive information only on official, secure websites.

HomeNewsArticle Display

Schriever turns out for solar eclipse

Solar Eclipse

Personnel gather outside of Building 400, Monday, Aug. 21, 2017 at Schriever Air Force Base, Colorado, to view the solar eclipse. The partial eclipse over Colorado dimmed the sky and reached approximately 90 percent totality. Scientists predict the next solar eclipse over North America will happen April 8, 2024. (U.S. Air Force photo/Christopher DeWitt)

Solar Eclipse

This photo composite shows the 2017 solar eclipse over Schriever Air Force Base Colorado, Monday, Aug. 21, 2017. The partial eclipse over Colorado dimmed the sky and reached approximately 90 percent totality. The image, composed of 7 photos, was exposed through a dense green filter for safety. This solar eclipse was the first to sweep across America in 99 years. (U.S. Air Force photo illustration/Dennis Rogers)

SCHRIEVER AIR FORCE BASE, Colo. -- Personnel gather outside of Building 400, Monday, Aug. 21, 2017 at Schriever Air Force Base, Colorado, to view the solar eclipse. The partial eclipse over Colorado dimmed the sky and reached approximately 90 percent totality. Scientists predict the next solar eclipse over North America will happen April 8, 2024. (U.S. Air Force photo/Christopher DeWitt)
Previous Story
Next Story