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Team Schriever improves memory skills

Team Schriever improves memory skills

Airmen attend a “Memory and Mnemonics” class at Schriever Air Force Base, Colorado, March 15, 2018. During the class, Airmen discussed short-term memory, long-term memory, functions of the brain and memory techniques. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Arielle Vasquez)

Team Schriever improves memory skills

Airman 1st Class Mary Czarnecki, aerospace and operational physiological technician with the 21st Aerospace Medicine Squadron, instructs Airmen during a “Memory and Mnemonics” class at Schriever Air Force Base, Colorado, March 15, 2018. The class informed Airmen of memory and mnemonic techniques they can use in their daily lives. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Arielle Vasquez)

SCHRIEVER AIR FORCE BASE, Colo. -- Forgetfulness can lead to major problems in work and life in general.

Fortunately, the 21st Aerospace Medicine Squadron provided Airmen with memory improvement tactics during a “Memory and Mnemonics” class at Schriever Air Force Base, Colorado, March 15.

During the class, Airmen discussed short-term memory, long-term memory, functions of the brain and memory activities.

“The purpose of this is to give people the tools to improve their memory,” said Airman 1st Class Mary Czarnecki, aerospace and operational physiological technician with the 21st AMDS. “There are instances where people forget key information, which can lead to on-the-job mishaps. This class serves to combat that and reinforce those skills.”

According to the National Center for Biotechnology Information, mnemonic training results in a higher memory capacity and can reshape brain networks to support memory.

During the class, Czarnecki provided Airmen with a photo activity to test everyone on what they were able to remember from the slides. She went on to inform the class that testing your skills with brain activities is a way to improve memory in the long run.

“Challenging your brain with new information frequently can sharpen one’s skills,” she said. “Other things important to memory retention is sleep and exercise.”

Master Sgt. Janelle Amador, career assistance advisor with the 50th Force Support Squadron, said attending this class provided her with skills she can start using right away.

“I have a study skills class I teach and I plan to incorporate the memory techniques we learned into my class,” she said. “The instructor discussed many useful tips and techniques. My favorite one is the mnemonic peg system, which is a memory aid that works by creating mental associations between two objects. There are several techniques out there, but that one works the best for me.”

Airmen in attendance expressed how beneficial it was to be a part of the discussion.

“I thought the class was interesting and very helpful,” said Airman 1st Class Matthew Ulloa, orbital analyst from the 4th Space Operations Squadron. “I tend to forget details and the techniques I learned today will definitely come in handy. Some of the information Czarnecki taught us are things I heard before, but actually understanding the theory behind it makes memory tricks easier and applicable.”

Amador added she hopes to see more Airmen attend this class in the future.

“I could tell everyone was engaged during this class and I hope to see more of that,” she said. “The more people come out to support these classes, the more often we can have this and also have more of a variety. Feedbacks are important and if they can tell us areas of improvement and even classes they would like to see in the future, we will do our best to make that happen.”

The next 21st AMDS class, “Distractive Driver,” is scheduled for 8:30 – 9:30 a.m. April 11.

For more information, call the 21st AMDS at 556-4185. To sign up for classes, call FTAC at 567-5927.


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