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Green Dot focuses on prevention, culture change

Green Dot focuses on prevention, culture change

Now in its third year, Schriever Air Force Base’s Green Dot program leaders rely on the program’s familiarity to move it forward and continue its success in the future. This year’s focus will be on culture change and proactive behavior that will strengthen protective factors and relationships. (Courtesy graphic)

Green Dot focuses on prevention, culture change

Schriever Air Force Base members attend a Green Dot Training at Schriever AFB, Colorado, April 13, 2018. The course aims to effectively teach Airmen how to prevent sexual assault, domestic violence, stalking and suicide. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Arielle Vasquez)

SCHRIEVER AIR FORCE BASE, Colo. -- The 2018 Green Dot Program courses kicked off at Schriever Air Force Base, Colorado, April 3.

The course aims to effectively teach Airmen how to prevent sexual assault, domestic violence, stalking and suicide.

Those who have not received any prior Green Dot training will be required to take a 90-minute class, which will cover all the subject material of both the previous suicide prevention training and Green Dot, while a second, 60-minute “refresher” class will be available for those who completed last year’s training.

Classes will take place every Tuesday from 2 – 3 p.m. and every Friday from 8 – 9 a.m. in the Building 300 auditorium.

“This year’s focus will be on culture change and proactive behavior to strengthen protective factors and relationships,” said Ken Robinson, Specialist for the Primary Prevention of Violence from the 50th Space Wing. “The Green Dot message is that everyone can make a difference. It’s a positive choice someone makes to intervene, which makes it less likely for bad behavior to occur.”

While the core of the curriculum has remained the same, there are several changes to the presentation, such as the addition of more activities and videos.

Staff Sgt. Shelby Parry, GPS maintenance support from the 50th Space Communications Squadron and lead Green Dot coordinator, spoke of the importance of the training.

“What we teach is a message that matters,” she said. “Doing this training will help us to change things for the better and make a difference.

“My favorite part about Green Dot training is when you can see on someone’s face that they understand the message, and it hits home with them,” she continued. “Over the years, the Air Force has provided many trainings covering these topics, but I don’t think any one of them lived up to Green Dot and its ability to affect change.”

Even though the deadline for 100 percent wing compliance is Nov. 30, Robinson said he strives to reach 100 percent wing compliance at least a month earlier.

He also said Schriever members will begin to see the positive impacts from Green Dot once members fully understand and utilize the methodology.

“Green Dot is based on a social-ecological model and on the theory that small groups of people can change norms in a community,” Robinson said. “Once a certain amount of people start believing the Green Dot philosophy and living it, other people will be influenced by that.

“When there are more green dots than red dots, that means we’ve changed the culture,” he continued. “Let us start building those green dot numbers up and make this a good year.”

To learn more about Green Dot or how to become an implementer or coordinator, contact Robinson at 567-2647 or Parry at 567-4880.







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