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25th Space Range Squadron provides platform for joint warfighters

Tech. Sgt. Maurice Moyer, 25th Space Range Squadron standardization and evaluation noncommissioned officer in charge, performs maintenance on an antenna at their warehouse, Colorado Springs, Colorado, Jan. 24, 2020. The squadron is responsible for providing a platform for developing lethal, agile and resilient joint warfighters. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Matthew Coleman-Foster)

Tech. Sgt. Maurice Moyer, 25th Space Range Squadron standardization and evaluation noncommissioned officer in charge, performs maintenance on an antenna at their warehouse, Colorado Springs, Colorado, Jan. 24, 2020. The squadron is responsible for providing a platform for developing lethal, agile and resilient joint warfighters. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Matthew Coleman-Foster)

Master Sgt. Steven Edmon, 25th Space Range Squadron mission assurance operations flight chief, connects to an antenna to maneuver it at their warehouse, Colorado Springs, Colorado, Jan. 24, 2020. The unit conducts operations through three capabilities: live fixed range, a live deployable range and the range closed loop environment. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Matthew Coleman-Foster)

Master Sgt. Steven Edmon, 25th Space Range Squadron mission assurance operations flight chief, connects to an antenna to maneuver it at their warehouse, Colorado Springs, Colorado, Jan. 24, 2020. The unit conducts operations through three capabilities: live fixed range, a live deployable range and the range closed loop environment. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Matthew Coleman-Foster)

Master Sgt. Steven Edmon, 25th Space Range Squadron mission assurance operations flight chief, left, and Tech. Sgt. Ryan Seamster, 25th SRS communication focal point noncommissioned officer in charge, reinstall a K-under feed on a ground multi-band terminal antenna at their warehouse, Colorado Springs, Colorado, Jan. 24, 2020. The 25th SRS provides customers a safe and secure environment to allow for satellite communication jamming training for how to fight through a contested environment. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Matthew Coleman-Foster)

Master Sgt. Steven Edmon, 25th Space Range Squadron mission assurance operations flight chief, left, and Tech. Sgt. Ryan Seamster, 25th SRS communication focal point noncommissioned officer in charge, reinstall a K-under feed on a ground multi-band terminal antenna at their warehouse, Colorado Springs, Colorado, Jan. 24, 2020. The 25th SRS provides customers a safe and secure environment to allow for satellite communication jamming training for how to fight through a contested environment. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Matthew Coleman-Foster)

Master Sgt. Steven Edmon, 25th Space Range Squadron mission assurance operations flight chief, left, and Tech. Sgt. Ryan Seamster, 25th SRS communication focal point noncommissioned officer in charge, prepare equipment for an upcoming support at their warehouse, Colorado Springs, Colorado, Jan. 24, 2020. Due to mission partners and customers operating on a global scale, the 25th SRS’ operators, maintainers, intelligence and communication Airmen are often sent overseas to support regional command mission needs. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Matthew Coleman-Foster)

Master Sgt. Steven Edmon, 25th Space Range Squadron mission assurance operations flight chief, left, and Tech. Sgt. Ryan Seamster, 25th SRS communication focal point noncommissioned officer in charge, prepare equipment for an upcoming support at their warehouse, Colorado Springs, Colorado, Jan. 24, 2020. Due to mission partners and customers operating on a global scale, the 25th SRS’ operators, maintainers, intelligence and communication Airmen are often sent overseas to support regional command mission needs. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Matthew Coleman-Foster)

SCHRIEVER AIR FORCE BASE, Colo. --

The 25th Space Range Squadron, a mission partner  located at Schriever Air Force Base and falls under Air Combat Command’s Nevada Test and Training Range at Nellis AFB, Nevada, recently was recently named one of ACC’s winners of the Air Force Outstanding Unit Award.

 The unit provides a space electronic warfare range for developing lethal, agile and resilient joint warfighters.

 “We give customers a safe and secure environment to conduct satellite communication jamming and aid them in training how to fight through a contested environment,” said Lt. Col. Jason Powell, 25th SRS commander.

The 25th SRS’ service to the nation began June 13, 1917, when it was activated as the 20th Aero Squadron. It was formally changed to the 25th Aero Squadron June 22, 1917.  During this time, the unit was responsible for flying British-made SE-5 aircraft and participated in combat operations during the Meuse-Argonne Campaign in World War I.

“The 25th has evolved over 100 years of existence from direct combat in World War I to more of a combat support role in today’s incarnation,” said Maj. Joshua Vaccaro, 25th SRS director of operations.  

Advancing into the space realm, the unit now conducts their operations through three capabilities: live fixed range, a live deployable range and the range closed loop environment.

The live fixed range capability allows the unit to host multiple mission partners and support within the continental United States. The live deployable range brings the range capability into their mission partners’ backyard to support mission partners ‘training where they fight’. The range’s closed loop environment is a “range in a box” that can be driven to a customer’s location and connected, providing a customer-specific, adversary with highly threat-representative targets to promote high-end training in a low-risk environment.

“Today, through our capabilities, we [25th SRS] strive to live up to the legacy of excellence by using our various range skillsets to train jamming-savvy warfighters,” Vaccaro said.

Because their mission partners and customers span the globe, the 25th SRS’s operators, maintainers, intelligence and communication Airmen are often sent overseas to regionals commands to support mission needs.

 “As part of the 25th, I’ve been to Hawaii, Germany and all over the U.S. supporting our customers and training them to fight through satellite jamming environments,” said Tech. Sgt. Maurice Moyer, 25th SRS standardization and evaluation noncommissioned officer in charge.

In providing highly sought after services for warfighters from the Air Force, Army, Navy, Marines and a rapidly growing list of coalition partners, the unit always has something going on. The Airmen support more than 30 unique mission partners and 30 events annually in approximately 250 days of operations.

“With the space range experience we provide, our warfighters are going to succeed against any adversary, any time,” said Moyer.

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