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What to know when moving out of Air Force dormitories

Airman 1st Class Billie Fisler, Distributed Mission Operations Center – Space administrator, carries a box to her car at Peterson Air Force Base, Colorado, April 24, 2020. Fisler is currently moving out of the dormitories due to occupancy exceeding 95%. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Jonathan Whitely)

Airman 1st Class Billie Fisler, Distributed Mission Operations Center – Space administrator, carries a box to her car at Peterson Air Force Base, Colorado, April 24, 2020. Fisler is currently moving out of the dormitories due to occupancy exceeding 95%. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Jonathan Whitely)

SCHRIEVER AIR FORCE BASE, Colo. --

When junior enlisted Airmen reach the rank of senior airman, get married, claim dependents or an installation’s dormitory occupation percentage reaches 95% capacity -- they are typically offered a chance to move out of the dormitories.

 

First sergeants work with an Airman’s supervisor, superintendent and commander to make sure Airmen have a solid plan in place to ensure they are prepared for the mental and financial stress that often pairs with moving.


 

“Moving off base is a tremendous opportunity,” said Senior Master Sgt. Micahel Guanill, 50th Operations Group first sergeant. “There are a lot of upfront costs that come with moving that Airmen can sometimes, by no fault of their own, neglect to consider. Airmen should take the time to research prospective residences before entering any contractual agreement.”

 

One Airman currently moving out of the dormitories is Airman 1st Class Billie Fisler, Distributed Mission Operations Center - Space administrator.


 

“Moving out isn’t as black and white as I thought it would be,” she said. “There’s a lot that goes into it as leadership really wants to make sure we’re ready to move out and can handle being on our own.”

 


 

After receiving an offer from the Airman Dorm Leaders to move out of the dorms, Airmen must be approved by their first sergeant and/or their commander to proceed to the next step -- sign a rental agreement or buy a house.


 

“I was lucky enough to find a place that fit what I was looking for,” Fisler said. “It’s in a good location, not too far from work and, most importantly -- it’s pet friendly.”


 

Airmen are required to have a budget and move-out plan prepared prior to their move out date. 

The budget should have:

  • Total pay (to include BAH and BAS)

  • Monthly rent

  • Cost of food

  • Utilities

  • Any outstanding expenses (i.e. car payments)

  • Any additional expenses (i.e. furniture, utensils, etc.)


 

“Airmen who are hopeful to move out of the dorms should start planning early,” said Guanill.  “Have your finances in order and remember your command team considers the whole [Airman] concept when recommending and approving Airmen to move off base.”



 

However, before an Airman can start to receive their basic allowance for housing and basic allowance for subsistence, they must pass a dormitory room inspection, certifying they left their room in excellent condition so another Airman can move into it as soon as possible.

 

 

“Airmen have a responsibility to maintain their government quarters,” Guanill said. “During the change of occupancy inspection, ADLs not only inspect the room for cleanliness, they also identify maintenance issues and make sure those issues are resolved prior to the next Airman moving in.”


 

To set up a financial budget, call the Airman and Family Readiness Center at 719-567-3920.

For any questions about the move-out process, contact your first sergeant.

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