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AFRC provides Airmen, families with resources

Master Sgt. John Coddington, Peterson Air Force Base Airman and Family Readiness Center noncommissioned officer, counsels a member about resources available at the AFRC, Aug. 13, 2020, at Peterson AFB, Colorado. The AFRCs at Peterson and Schriever AFBs, Colorado, are available to all garrison Airmen and their dependents. The AFRCs offer a wide variety of resources ranging from financial aid to casualty augmentation support. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Jonathan Whitely)

Master Sgt. John Coddington, Peterson Air Force Base Airman and Family Readiness Center noncommissioned officer, counsels a member about resources available at the AFRC, Aug. 13, 2020, at Peterson AFB, Colorado. The AFRCs at Peterson and Schriever AFBs, Colorado, are available to all garrison Airmen and their dependents. The AFRCs offer a wide variety of resources ranging from financial aid to casualty augmentation support. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Jonathan Whitely)

SCHRIEVER AIR FORCE BASE, Colo. --

The Airman and Family Readiness Centers at Peterson and Schriever Air Force Bases, Colorado, provide Airmen and their families with the resources and support needed to navigate life’s trickiest situations.

The AFRC is available to all Airmen – single, married or living in the dorms and their families. This is why they changed their name in the early 2000s from the Family Support Center to the AFRC, so Airmen would know, no matter what their status is – the AFRCs are there to help them.

“We’re here to help service members and their families with a huge assortment of things, whether it be finances, job searching, relocation and so forth,” said Paul Smith, Peterson AFB AFRC chief. “We try to connect our members with resources to keep them mission ready.”

The services offered at both the Peterson and Schriever AFRCs are free to all active duty, guard, retiree, contractor, Department of Defense civilians and spouses.

“As long as someone’s available, we’re going to assist anyone who walks through our door,” said Kendra Humphrey, Schriever AFB AFRC Exceptional Family Member Program family support coordinator. “We’re going to do our best to service their needs, and if we can’t, we’re going to refer them to someone who is qualified to meet their needs.”

The AFRC runs the following programs:

  • Exceptional Family Member Program – Connects families with special needs to the systems of care they need.
  • Transition Assistance Program – Course for separating service members that highlights benefits, resume writing, interviewing techniques and more.
  • Relocation Assistance Program – Provides services designed to help personnel and family through the process of a permanent change of station.
  • Personal and Work Life Program – Highlights activities and services to promote a positive family environment.
  • Readiness Program – Provide military members and their families with tools, resources and activities essential for military deployment.
  • Personal Financial Readiness – Provides educations, information and counseling to Department of Defense personnel and their families on a wide range of personal finance topics.
  • Air Force Aid Society – Provides loans and grants to assist with financial emergency on a case-by-case basis.
  • Employment Program – Assists in developing a career plan, establishing community network contacts and utilizing employment listings.
  • Air Force Families Forever – Long-term after-care program established to provide proactive outreach to family members who have lost a loved one who was active duty Air Force.
  • Casualty Assistance and Survivor Benefit Plan – The Casualty Office submits reports, makes notifications and assists next-of-kin of deceased military members. SBP can provide financial support for a spouse or child after a member’s death.
  • Volunteer Resources Program – Collaborates with agencies and organizations to provide a range of opportunities for base volunteers.
  • Installation Voting Assistance Program – Works to ensure service members and eligible family members are aware of their right to vote and have to tools and resources to do so.
  • Military and Family Life Consultant – Professionals who are available to listen and help service members and their families through anonymous counseling.

Regardless of situation, the AFRCs is there to help whoever. The centers have specialists who are trained and educated on all the courses the centers have to offer.

Although the centers are geographically separated and support different bases, Airmen can use either AFRC at their own convenience.

“We all have the same core services, and we may execute them slightly different, but the end goal is always the same,” Smith said.

Appointments at either office are encouraged but not required. However, scheduling an appointment gives the AFRC representative time to plan what they are going to go over, enabling them to maximize their time.

“You never know what you’re going to get,” said Rhonda Sargent, Peterson AFB AFRC employment manager team lead. “You have to know where your resources are and how to use and maximize them.”

For more information on the Schriever AFB AFRC, call (719) 567-3920 or visit https://50fss.com/afrc/.

For more information on the Peterson AFB AFRC, call (719) 834-6141 or visit https://www.21fss.com/about/airman-family-readiness/.

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