An official website of the United States government
Here's how you know
A .mil website belongs to an official U.S. Department of Defense organization in the United States.
A lock (lock ) or https:// means you’ve safely connected to the .mil website. Share sensitive information only on official, secure websites.

HomeNewsArticle Display

Top Three hosts Triad Resilience Run-Walk-Crawl

The Falcon Top Three hosted a Triad Resilience Run-Walk-Crawl event to help raise money for the Remount Foundation Sept. 26, 2020 at Schriever Air Force Base, Colorado. Lt. Col. Alan Burwell, 50th Operations Support Squadron commander, made a plaque out of purpleheart wood with a triskelion to give to the participant who logged the most miles. Burwell said the triskelion is considered as the symbol of progress, personal growth and improvement in Celtic culture. (U.S. Air Force courtesy photo)

The Falcon Top Three hosted a Triad Resilience Run-Walk-Crawl event to help raise money for the Remount Foundation Sept. 26, 2020 at Schriever Air Force Base, Colorado. Lt. Col. Alan Burwell, 50th Operations Support Squadron commander, made a plaque out of purpleheart wood with a triskelion to give to the participant who logged the most miles. Burwell said the triskelion is considered as the symbol of progress, personal growth and improvement in Celtic culture. (U.S. Air Force courtesy photo)

SCHRIEVER AIR FORCE BASE, Colo. --

The Falcon Top Three hosted a Triad Resilience Run-Walk-Crawl event to raise money for the Remount Foundation Sept. 26, 2020, at Schriever Air Force Base, Colorado.

The Remount Foundation is equine assisted learning for military, veterans and their family, according to their website. The foundation recently hosted a resilience event for 10 21st Comptroller Squadron Airmen.

Lt. Col. Justin Gabbard, outgoing 21st CPTS commander, and Lt. Col. Alan Burwell, 50th Operations Support Squadron commander, organized the resilience event in response to the loss of a teammate. Approximately 20 Airmen signed up to crawl, walk or run a one mile, 1.5 mile, 3.5 mile or 12 mile course; however, there was no set minimum distance.

“It was an initiative with multiple objectives,” Gabbard said. “With the stand-up of the Peterson-Schriever Garrison, we wanted to create an environment where leadership teams across both installations could meet. We also wanted to send a message to our teams that their leadership cares and raise some money for a good cause that gives back to Airmen.”

The event already raised more than $1,200 for the Remount Foundation and is expected to top $1,500 when all the donations are finalized.

“Our squadron has had some challenges recently,” Gabbard said. “Remount reached out to us and has allowed us to use their services. We really appreciate how they’ve taken care of our Airmen, so we wanted to give back to them.”

Although Gabbard and Burwell organized the run-walk-crawl, the Falcon Top Three sponsored the event to ensure it ran smoothly.

“We hosted the event as a private organization,” said Master Sgt. Jonathan Mollison, 21st CPTS operations superintendent and Falcon Top Three member. “We worked with [the organizers] on the logistics of setting the event up, making sure the word got out there in the right way so everyone had an opportunity to participate.”

Mollison, who is currently on crutches, walked the event. “It was incredible to be a part of,” he said. “To see so many people fired up to support a good cause is amazing and shows just how much leadership really cares about their Airmen.”

Each participant was sponsored for each mile they either crawled, walked or run. Sponsors donated money a minimum donation of .50 cents per mile.

The participant who logged the most miles received a plaque made of purpleheart wood with a handmade triskelion. Burwell made the triskelion, which is considered a symbol of progress, personal growth and improvement. Gabbard travelled 40 miles during a 24 hour period, the highest of any participants.

“We wanted to shape this to where anyone could participate,” Gabbard said. “If you could only run one lap, then that’s all you had to do.”

COVID-19 precautions were implemented to ensure the safety of the participants. Airmen were provided hand sanitizer, a health and safety briefing and were required to a sign-in to limit how many Airmen were on one of the four courses at once.

“As leadership teams, we always do what we can to make sure our teammates know they’re loved and cared for,” Gabbard said. “But sometimes our teammates need care and support outside of our capabilities, which is why the funds are going to Remount. We need to do what we can to make sure Airmen at every level knows there is someone who genuinely cares for them and is willing to do whatever they can to make sure they know that.”

Previous Story
Next Story