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Brosseau, Ross win 19th annual Turkey Trot

Maj. Jason Brosseau, 26th Space Aggressors Squadron, raises his fist as he approaches the finish line Nov. 20, 2020, at Schriever Air Force Base, Colorado during the 19th annual Turkey Trot race. Brosseau’s finish marked his third consecutive victory in the event. (U.S. Space Force photo by Marcus Hill)

Maj. Jason Brosseau, 26th Space Aggressors Squadron, raises his fist as he approaches the finish line Nov. 20, 2020, at Schriever Air Force Base, Colorado during the 19th annual Turkey Trot race. Brosseau’s finish marked his third consecutive victory in the event. (U.S. Space Force photo by Marcus Hill)

Master Sgt. Bonnie Ross, 7th Space Operations Squadron, works her way uphill after the final turn of the 19th annual Turkey Trot race Nov. 20, 2020, at Schriever Air Force Base, Colorado. Ross was the first female competitor to finish and did so in 22 minutes, 2 seconds.  (U.S. Space Force photo by Marcus Hill)

Master Sgt. Bonnie Ross, 7th Space Operations Squadron, works her way uphill after the final turn of the 19th annual Turkey Trot race Nov. 20, 2020, at Schriever Air Force Base, Colorado. Ross was the first female competitor to finish and did so in 22 minutes, 2 seconds. (U.S. Space Force photo by Marcus Hill)

Runners begin the 19th annual Turkey Trot race Nov. 20, 2020, at Schriever Air Force Base, Colorado. The 2.5-mile race had 44 competitors participate and everyone received T-shirts upon completion. (U.S. Space Force photo by Marcus Hill)

Runners begin the 19th annual Turkey Trot race Nov. 20, 2020, at Schriever Air Force Base, Colorado. The 2.5-mile race had 44 competitors participate and everyone received T-shirts upon completion. (U.S. Space Force photo by Marcus Hill)

Member of the 6th Space Operations Squadron give thumbs up after completing the 19th annual Turkey Trot race Nov. 20, 2020, at Schriever Air Force Base, Colorado. The 50t Force Support Squadron provided T-shirts to all who finished the race. From left are 6th SOPS’s Paul Deutsch, Forrest Templin and Brendyn Baker. (U.S. Space Force photo by Marcus Hill)

Member of the 6th Space Operations Squadron give thumbs up after completing the 19th annual Turkey Trot race Nov. 20, 2020, at Schriever Air Force Base, Colorado. The 50t Force Support Squadron provided T-shirts to all who finished the race. From left are 6th SOPS’s Paul Deutsch, Forrest Templin and Brendyn Baker. (U.S. Space Force photo by Marcus Hill)

Seth Cannello, 50th Force Support Squadron fitness center director, shows runners where to go for the 19th annual Turkey Trot race Nov. 20, 2020, at Schriever Air Force Base, Colorado. The race followed the “wing run” route, which begins north of the batting cages and continues west on the running trail, then north along the perimeter fence line. The route then wraps along the housing area and back to the start. (U.S. Space Force photo by Marcus Hill)

Seth Cannello, 50th Force Support Squadron fitness center director, shows runners where to go for the 19th annual Turkey Trot race Nov. 20, 2020, at Schriever Air Force Base, Colorado. The race followed the “wing run” route, which begins north of the batting cages and continues west on the running trail, then north along the perimeter fence line. The route then wraps along the housing area and back to the start. (U.S. Space Force photo by Marcus Hill)

SCHRIEVER AIR FORCE BASE, Colo. --

Maj. Jason Brosseau, 26th Space Aggressors Squadron, captured his third consecutive victory in the men’s category at the 19th annual Turkey Trot on base Nov. 20, and Master Sgt. Bonnie Ross, 7th Space Operations Squadron, earned her first victory in the women’s division.

Brosseau finished first out of 44 runners and clocked in at 13 minutes, 48 seconds. Ross finished in 22:02 in the 2.5-mile race.

The top three male and female finishers earned $50, $40 and $30 gift cards, and all participants received T-shirts.

The race followed the “wing run” route, which begin north of the batting cages and continues west on the running trail then north along the perimeter fence line. The route then wraps along the housing area and back to the start. 

During the first mile, Brosseau said Santiago Trujillo, who placed second, kept the field on their toes. 

“Usually when somebody goes off fast, you don’t know if they’re serious or not,” Brosseau said. “We knew about half a mile in that [Trujillo] meant business. His first mile was a 5:22.” 

The major ran a 5:28 and thought Trujillo would end his two-race win streak. Brosseau, however, used his savvy to excel the final 1.5 miles. 

“I took the lead right when the wind shifted to a headwind,” Brosseau said. “I knew if I didn’t open up, he’d get the best of me. I put in a surge and made [Trujillo and me] work equally on that headwind.”

In previous events such as the bases annual half marathon, which Brosseau also won three times in a row, Brosseau held sizable leads. After eclipsing Trujillo, however, Brosseau said he looked back more than normal to ensure he was clear. 

“You can’t help but think that he could rally and outkick me if he’s feeling good,” Brosseau said. “The kid definitely had wheels and I had to look over my shoulders to make sure he didn’t sneak up on me that last half mile.” 

For the women, Ross staved off her competition, but not without her own difficulties. 

Ross finished more than 40 seconds ahead of Jennifer Anthony, who placed second among female competitors, but Ross said she struggled on the back end of the race.

“Every time I thought I’d hit a second wind and thought I could sprint, another hill would come up,” Ross said. “It looked like [the hills] hit everyone else pretty hard, too.”

While the race proved tough and provided a workout for Ross, she said the low-key nature of the event made it more enjoyable. Arriving to compete without having to complete forms and being able to run with fellow Wingmen provided a necessary boost.

“I didn’t think the run would happen because of the weather and there weren’t a lot of people on base [Friday],” Ross said. “I’m excited that they did [the race] and people showed up to compete.”

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