An official website of the United States government
Here's how you know
A .mil website belongs to an official U.S. Department of Defense organization in the United States.
A lock (lock ) or https:// means you’ve safely connected to the .mil website. Share sensitive information only on official, secure websites.

HomeNewsArticle Display

Lazyman Triathlon - not for the lazy

Schriever members planning on participating in the Lazyman Triathlon may expect a lot of running, swimming and bike riding for the February event. Participants must swim 2.4 miles, ride a cumulative distance of 112 miles on a bicycle, and of course, run a marathon, which is 26.2 miles. (Courtesy Photo)

Schriever members planning on participating in the Lazyman Triathlon may expect a lot of running, swimming and bike riding for the February event. Participants must swim 2.4 miles, ride a cumulative distance of 112 miles on a bicycle, and of course, run a marathon, which is 26.2 miles. (Courtesy Photo)

SCHRIEVER AIR FORCE BASE, Colo. -- A new year brings another month of the Lazyman Triathlon here at Schriever Air Force Base, Colorado, - but beware, there is nothing lazy about this event.

The triathlon, held during the month of February, is a twist on the traditional triathlon.

"The whole concept behind the Lazyman Triathlon is for [participants] to have an entire month to do the distances and events of an Ironman triathlon," said Seth Cannello, Fitness and Sports manager.

Participants must swim 2.4 miles, which can be between 75-80 laps (down and back) in a standard indoor pool. Competitors must also ride a cumulative distance of 112 miles on a bicycle; indoor upright bicycles are permitted because of potential weather complications. Finally, competitors must run a marathon - which is 26.2 miles.  

All events and progress will be individually recorded on the honor system.

Cannello jokingly explained participants will have a bonus day in the month to complete the triathlon, because 2016 is a leap year.

Cannello has received questions in the past as to why the event is held so early in the year. Obviously, February in Colorado isn't always friendly for running, swimming and biking outdoors.

"In my opinion you can do the event on any month that you want," said Cannello. "I chose February because normally we see a whole bunch of people that come in with their New Year's resolutions and they're pretty good through the month of January. But then when February rolls around, they kind of lose that interest so I just thought it would be a good way to increase people's normal workout loads."

Triathlon participants will be provided a calculator that helps record progress more accurately than machines might.

Juli Yim, recreation assistant, is the coordinator for the event.

"We sponsor the event, so we take people, sign them up and try to get them motivated a little bit," she said. "We give them a tracker to track their progress and if they have any questions throughout the event, we're here to help them out."

Yim, a participant in last year's Lazyman Triathlon, shared a memorable experience she witnessed during last year's event. Yim was passing by the aerobic room and saw one person riding a stationary bicycle, while watching a video on the kiosk.

"He did his entire 112 miles in that one day and was having a good time," said Yim. "Throughout the day, a number of other people came in the room and joined in - and at one point, there were probably 10 people in there all laughing and joking and having a good time. You could tell these people didn't know each other walking in, but by the end of their time, it was like this community effort to make it."

Cannello did have a word of caution on improper participation he's seen in the past.

"The one thing that I would say that I don't like, and I saw this last year, was seeing people riding upright stationary bicycles in the gym at the lowest level possible - and they were cranking the distance out as fast as they could," said Cannello. "To me, that's not really the whole idea behind the program. It's not just to finish the program or the distances, it's to push yourself harder than what you normally would and to really get benefit out of the exercises."

In the past, many competitors have signed up for the Lazyman Triathlon and not finished. Cannello explained that administratively, it takes a lot of time to give each participant all the rules and resources needed to compete.

To combat this, Cannello installed an important rule.

If someone signs up and does not finish, penalty points will be taken away from them/their unit. Five points are awarded for participating and finishing, but alternately, 5 points will be taken away for not finishing.

"I feel like anybody can finish if they're really serious about the program, but if they lollygag around or don't really want to do it, then they're not going to finish. So that's one of the reasons we have the point system set up like that," said Cannello.

The popularity of the Lazyman Triathlon is spreading throughout the Air Force. Several Air Force bases have reached out to Cannello for more information on the program.

Registration ends Feb. 7, and trackers must be turned in March 4. Every participant who finishes the event along with turning in their tracker on time will also receive a free shirt.

For more information on the Lazyman Triathlon or to sign up, email Yim or contact the base fitness center at 567-6628.
Previous Story
Next Story