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50 NOG changes command

Col. DeAnna Burt, 50th Space Wing Commander, passes the 50th Network Operations Group guidon to Col. W. Scott Angerman during the group’s change of command ceremony at Schriever Air Force Base, Colorado, Thursday, June 23, 2016. Angerman assumed command of the group from Col. Jason Sutton. (U.S. Air Force photo/ Christopher DeWitt)

Col. DeAnna Burt, 50th Space Wing Commander, passes the 50th Network Operations Group guidon to Col. W. Scott Angerman during the group’s change of command ceremony at Schriever Air Force Base, Colorado, Thursday, June 23, 2016. Angerman assumed command of the group from Col. Jason Sutton. (U.S. Air Force photo/ Christopher DeWitt)

Col. W. Scott Angerman addresses the 50th Network Operations Group as its new commander during the group’s change of command ceremony at Schriever Air Force Base, Colorado, Thursday, June 23, 2016. Angerman assumed command of the group from Col. Jason Sutton. (U.S. Air Force photo/Christopher Dewitt)

Col. W. Scott Angerman addresses the 50th Network Operations Group as its new commander during the group’s change of command ceremony at Schriever Air Force Base, Colorado, Thursday, June 23, 2016. Angerman assumed command of the group from Col. Jason Sutton. (U.S. Air Force photo/Christopher Dewitt)

SCHRIEVER AIR FORCE BASE, Colo. --

The 50th Network Operations Group welcomed its new leadership during a change of command ceremony June 23 at the 50th Space Wing Headquarters.

Col. W. Scott Angerman took command of the group from its previous commander, Col. Jason Sutton.

Col. DeAnna Burt, 50 SW commander and presiding officer, welcomed Angerman to the wing and NOG family and wished the incoming commander success in leading the group.

 “I couldn’t have picked a better guy to replace Jason Sutton,” she said. “Scott Angerman is a former 22nd Space Operations Squadron commander so he and his family have experience on the hill. They’ve been here before and this is home to them.”

Prior to his new assignment at Schriever, Angerman served as the Joint Fires Element chief for U.S. Pacific Command Operations Directorate’s Operations Division at Camp H.M. Smith, Hawaii.

“As I stand before you today, I am truly humbled and honored,” he said. “Humbled to once again be associated with and part of the 50th Space Wing and the 50th Network Operations Group’s ongoing missions, and honored for the opportunity to serve the Air Force and our nation.”

Speaking of Sutton, Burt highlighted the impressive list of 50 NOG achievements under his guidance.

“(Sutton) has no joke made history in the NOG and in the Air Force,” said Burt. “We are now shaping how we do mission system defense throughout the entire Air Force due to his leadership. He’s really done a culture change during his command. He’s shown a lot of space guys, like me, who thought we knew our business, and taught us what it means to defend the mission in order to get it done.”

The 50 NOG is the Air Force’s largest network operations group, and is responsible for assuring access to space and cyberspace through the Air Force Satellite Control Network while providing critical information to the warfighters through the Global Broadcast Service.

During Sutton’s term, the 50 NOG enabled command and control for more than 175 satellites with a 99 percent mission success rate. The group supported 35 launches, 25 vehicle emergencies and 305,000 AFSCN supports, said Burt.

In his speech, Sutton took time to thank his friends and family, as well as the wing leadership and group members.

 “The thousands of people who are the NOG, represent the resilient will and determination of true heart and credibility,” he said. “It is your work spanning dozen of skill sets and work centers that the world takes notice of today, and in the future, and it is your spirit that I will carry with me as motivation beyond the shadow of the mountain.”

In closing, Sutton ended his speech with these remarks.

 “Credibility is an inherent respect, anchored in competence, that solves a problem and adds value to our purpose,” said Sutton. “Today, the 50 SW and specifically the 50 NOG carries tremendous credibility. Use this power for good, press forward against all odds and continue in excellence.”

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