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Airmen learn to overcome stress

Ruth Moore, 50th Force Support Squadron, answers questions during the Airman and Family Readiness Center’s “Overcome Overload” class at Schriever Air Force Base, Colorado, Thursday, July 7, 2016. Techniques to overcome stress ranged from taking a few days of leave to going out for small walks. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman William Tracy)

Ruth Moore, 50th Force Support Squadron, answers questions during the Airman and Family Readiness Center’s “Overcome Overload” class at Schriever Air Force Base, Colorado, Thursday, July 7, 2016. Techniques to overcome stress ranged from taking a few days of leave to going out for small walks. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman William Tracy)

Effective time management was a major talking point during the Airman and Family Readiness Center’s “Overcome Overload” class at Schriever Air Force Base, Colorado, Thursday, July 7, 2016. Time management was one of many aspects of stress control taught in the class. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman William Tracy)

Effective time management was a major talking point during the Airman and Family Readiness Center’s “Overcome Overload” class at Schriever Air Force Base, Colorado, Thursday, July 7, 2016. Time management was one of many aspects of stress control taught in the class. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman William Tracy)

SCHRIEVER AIR FORCE BASE, Colo.-- --

Balancing military life with family matters and personal time is no easy task. Sometimes it can be like stacking dominoes- a challenge on its own as the stack gets higher, but everything fits evenly into place. Other times though it feels like a house of cards, ready to blow-over at the slightest disturbance. It’s always a challenge. However, for the Airmen and civilians who attended the Overcome Overload class at the Airman and Family Readiness Center July 7, they gained an informative insight on how to cope with the stress factors of daily life, especially those unique to military service.

Participants learned about various techniques to help alleviate the stress that can accumulate in our lives. From taking a few days of leave for personal time to sticking to an exercise schedule to stay fit, to smaller things such as taking a few minutes of your day to reflect in a quiet environment or talk to a co-worker, the class covered a range of tools that could be used to improve one’s outlook- all in line with Comprehensive Airmen Fitness.

The class’ instructor, Ruth Moore, 50th Force Support Squadron, knows all too well how effective these techniques can be.

“For me personally, I’ve learned just to take a few moments to go for a walk or take some quiet time at my desk and close my eyes and take a deep breath.” said Moore. “It really helps me.”

Embracing these techniques is a personal commitment, indifferent to rank, occupation or social standing. Learning to mix the larger scale techniques with the smaller ones is a key strategy to reach the healthy balance of work and leisure we all should strive for, keeping the stack of dominoes stable no matter how high it becomes, without overloading oneself with the very methods meant to eliminate stress.

“You don’t have to practice everything at one time you can take bits and pieces and apply them to your life and still make big changes,” said Moore.

Departing with a new set of skills, attendees reflected on what they learned.

“It was very informative,” said Staff Sgt. Justine McCullough, 50th Force Support Squadron. “Dealing with a busy home life, having two young boys, it’s a lot to deal with after work. I would recommend it to everybody because learning about how to deal with stress is definitely a useful tool- it’s better to be proactive then reactive.”

For those who reached a point where they are ready to overcome stress but lack a solid foundation to start the process, the AFRC is there to extend a helping hand, said Moore.

For more information contact the Airman and Family Readiness Center at 567-3920

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