An official website of the United States government
Here's how you know
A .mil website belongs to an official U.S. Department of Defense organization in the United States.
A lock (lock ) or https:// means you’ve safely connected to the .mil website. Share sensitive information only on official, secure websites.

HomeNewsArticle Display

Operation DayHawk ensures mission readiness

Edward Roski, 50th Space Wing drug tester, displays an array of pamphlets on his desk Monday, Aug. 1, 2016, at Schriever Air Force Base, Colorado. Roski played a major role in conducting Operation DayHawk, which randomly selects active-duty service members for drug testing. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman William Tracy)

Edward Roski, 50th Space Wing drug tester, displays an array of pamphlets on his desk Monday, Aug. 1, 2016, at Schriever Air Force Base, Colorado. Roski played a major role in conducting Operation DayHawk, which randomly selects active-duty service members for drug testing. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman William Tracy)

The Schriever drug testing office offers an array of educational material to help increase awareness and promote resources available to Airmen and their families. The office conducts drug tests and provides information on how to lead a drug-free lifestyle. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman William Tracy)

The Schriever drug testing office offers an array of educational material to help increase awareness and promote resources available to Airmen and their families. The office conducts drug tests and provides information on how to lead a drug-free lifestyle. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman William Tracy)

SCHRIEVER AIR FORCE BASE, Colo.-- --

Drug testing, no matter how much service members dislike it, serves as a vital component of our mission, ensuring mission readiness and the welfare of our individual Airmen.

Operation DayHawk (and conversely Operation NightHawk, which, not surprisingly, is conducted at night) is a joint-effort between the drug testing office, Office of Special Investigations, security forces personnel and select volunteers. Airmen are randomly selected for testing as they enter the installation, with the last operation collecting a total of 51 samples, according to the base drug testing office. 

“We instill a lot of trust in our Airmen,” said Special Agent Timothy Grantonic with the Office of Special Investigation. “Along with trust there needs to be verification. It never hurts to check.”

Operation DayHawk is just one component of the drug testing office’s work, which also conducts briefings during RightStart and the First Term Airmen Center classes as well as hand out anti-drug use pamphlets on a regular basis. Their work is part of the long held Department of Defense wide effort to stamp-out drug use at the source and promote prevention of drug use for all military personnel.

For the Air Force, the consequences of illicit drug use are clear.

According to Air Force Instruction 44-121, Alcohol and Drug Abuse Prevention and Treatment (ADAPT) program, the Air Force “does not tolerate the illegal or improper use of drugs by Air Force personnel,” and use can result in “criminal prosecution resulting in a punitive discharge or administrative actions, including separation or discharge under other than honorable conditions.”

While Marijuana is legal for recreational and medical use in Colorado, it is important to remember that military members are federal employees and Schriever is a federal institution, therefore marijuana use strictly prohibited, and all base personal are subject to search.

The measures undertaken against drug violations and its consequences are not meant to intimidate but rather deter illicit drug use in the military, and serve as a testament to how seriously the armed forces treats the crime.

Fortunately, the military offers options to assure these consequences don’t happen, and the Air Force is no exception.

Programs such as ADAPT are centered on effective treatment and prevention for Airmen across the force, providing counseling, healthcare and other services with the aid of the TRICARE program.

However, when it comes to prevention and deterrence, a good old fashioned drug test is a tried-and -true method.

“You’re going to be tested not just here,” said Edward Roski, 50th Space Wing Drug Tester, who estimates the drug testing office collects more than 170 samples a week. “We do testing every day here. The message is think about the consequences if you thinking about doing drugs. What we do is a tool for deterrence. If you do drugs, you’re going to get caught.”

For more information on Operation DayHawk, contact the drug testing office at 567-5068.

 

Previous Story
Next Story