An official website of the United States government
Here's how you know
A .mil website belongs to an official U.S. Department of Defense organization in the United States.
A lock (lock ) or https:// means you’ve safely connected to the .mil website. Share sensitive information only on official, secure websites.

HomeNewsArticle Display

Schriever Inoculation season begins

Staff Sgt. Kelsey Skattum, 21st Medical Squadron medical technician, administers an influenza vaccine to Col. DeAnna Burt, 50th Space Wing commander, at Schriever Air Force Base, Colorado, Friday, Sept. 30, 2016. Flu season can begin as early as October and last as late as May. Influenza vaccines cause antibodies to develop in the body about two weeks after vaccination. These antibodies provide protection against infection with the viruses that are in the vaccine. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Matthew Coleman-Foster)

Staff Sgt. Kelsey Skattum, 21st Medical Squadron medical technician, administers an influenza vaccine to Col. DeAnna Burt, 50th Space Wing commander, at Schriever Air Force Base, Colorado, Friday, Sept. 30, 2016. Flu season can begin as early as October and last as late as May. Influenza vaccines cause antibodies to develop in the body about two weeks after vaccination. These antibodies provide protection against infection with the viruses that are in the vaccine. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Matthew Coleman-Foster)

SCHRIEVER AIR FORCE BASE, Colo. -- Staff Sgt. Kelsey Skattum, 21st Medical Squadron medical technician, administers an influenza vaccine to Col. DeAnna Burt, 50th Space Wing commander, at Schriever Air Force Base, Colorado, Friday, Sept. 30, 2016. Flu season can begin as early as October and last as late as May. Influenza vaccines cause antibodies to develop in the body about two weeks after vaccination. These antibodies provide protection against infection with the viruses that are in the vaccine. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Matthew Coleman-Foster)
Previous Story
Next Story