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  • Maintaining a spirit of excellence – A tribute to Black History Month

    What does Black History Month mean to me? Black History Month serves as a reminder of the struggles, challenges, and hardships which my family and others like me endured in America. This is a month to honor those who have paved the way for me and have triumphed during the darkest times in our history. I am U.S. Air Force Maj. Marshalria “Marsha” Vaughans, a native to Cleveland, Ohio, and Montgomery, Alabama. I am a wife and mother of three and this is my story.
  • Leadership Perspectives: 50th FSS

    How would you describe your leadership style?My leadership style is democratic, supportive and customer service based. I strive to be an engaged and involved leader that focuses on and cultivates the strengths of each individual team member. I rely heavily on the expertise of the team and encourage the maximization of contributions from individual
  • Remembering our Oath

    On Jan. 14, 50th Mission Support Group leadership readily encouraged our new executive officer, 1st. Lt. Hayden Graham, as he feverishly attempted to connect to the live stream of Gen. John Raymond’s swearing in ceremony as Chief of Space Operations of the United States Space Force.  After the live stream dropped repeatedly, Col. Brian Kehl, 50th
  • Core Values and Work Ethic

    What is work ethic? Work ethic is defined by Merriam-Webster as a belief in work as a moral good: a set of values centered on the importance of doing work and reflected especially in a desire or determination to work hard.
  • Job Satisfaction

    Job satisfaction is an elusive beast. It has escaped me many times in my military career, especially in my early years. Prior to my commission, I built computers, installed networks and developed applications for small businesses. It was easy to find my sense of satisfaction. The efforts of my work immediately translated into not only monetary
  • Practicing the three Rs

    As the new inspector general at Schriever Air Force Base serving with the best IG team and space wing in the world, one of the first orders of business was setting expectations. I expect people to be good servants to our taxpayers by showing up to work, doing good work and having a good attitude!
  • Mess Up, Screw Up, or Fudge Up

    Something that I have heard often since I’ve been in the Air Force – and realize I repeat every time I meet a new Defender in the squadron – is that mistakes aren’t punished but crimes are. Failures are the best way to learn the right way to do things, but speaking from a career field that has been accused of “eating its own,” sometimes the distinction is lost (especially if you’re receiving paperwork). How can an individual fail in a “no fail” mission while still learning and moving forward? Rather than try to figure this out on my own, I did what I’ve been raised to do – ask a SNCO. Thankfully, there was an answer from one of my SMSgts who summed it up as, “You succeed, mess up, screw up, or fudge up,” (to paraphrase A Christmas Story, he didn’t say “fudge”). I propose that we change the way we look at failures, and use this framework – “Mess Up, Screw Up, and Fudge Up” – to judge how bad a failure really is.
  • Other Hand Awareness: A simple approach to modern problems

    As with many of our duties, asking the important questions and noting simple changes could spark the flame of an entirely new way to complete a process or give valuable time back for other tasks that need to be completed. Footprints weren’t left on the moon by people who walked to work staring at the ground. Each of us has the opportunity to make an impact just as those pioneers did.
  • Other Hand Awareness: A simple approach to modern problems

    As with many of our duties, asking the important questions and noting simple changes could spark the flame of an entirely new way to complete a process or give valuable time back for other tasks that need to be completed. Footprints weren’t left on the moon by people who walked to work staring at the ground. Each of us has the opportunity to make an impact just as those pioneers did.
  • Airman’s Council president shares leadership perspective

    The word “leader” never meant much to me until I joined the military. I used to think a leader was someone who held a certain position or rank. Now as much as we like to believe those go hand in hand, that is not always the case. I have gone through a fair share of good and bad leadership, but what I learned is the negative ones teach you
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